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Archive for October, 2017

All the Missing Girls by Megan Miranda.

Paperback: 400 pages
Publisher: Simon & Schuster(January 31, 2017)
ISBN-10: 1501107976

 

Amazon Review:

Like the spellbinding psychological suspense in The Girl on the Train and Luckiest Girl Alive, Megan Miranda’s novel is a nail-biting, breathtaking story about the disappearances of two young women—a decade apart—told in reverse.
It’s been ten years since Nicolette Farrell left her rural hometown after her best friend, Corinne, disappeared from Cooley Ridge without a trace. Back again to tie up loose ends and care for her ailing father, Nic is soon plunged into a shocking drama that reawakens Corinne’s case and breaks open old wounds long since stitched.
The decade-old investigation focused on Nic, her brother Daniel, boyfriend Tyler, and Corinne’s boyfriend Jackson. Since then, only Nic has left Cooley Ridge. Daniel and his wife, Laura, are expecting a baby; Jackson works at the town bar; and Tyler is dating Annaleise Carter, Nic’s younger neighbor and the group’s alibi the night Corinne disappeared. Then, within days of Nic’s return, Annaleise goes missing.
Told backwards—Day 15 to Day 1—from the time Annaleise goes missing, Nic works to unravel the truth about her younger neighbor’s disappearance, revealing shocking truths about her friends, her family, and what really happened to Corinne that night ten years ago.
Like nothing you’ve ever read before, All the Missing Girls delivers in all the right ways. With twists and turns that lead down dark alleys and dead ends, you may think you’re walking a familiar path, but then Megan Miranda turns it all upside down and inside out and leaves us wondering just how far we would be willing to go to protect those we love.

 

Interesting.

That’s the word for this book.  I did enjoy learning about the group of friends and how rumors can be so detrimental. (Something I already knew, but brought it back to the front of my mind)

A few times I felt somewhat lost but did pick it up again. I guess my “pea brain” didn’t want to “go backwards” lol. 

I, myself don’t think I’d want to relive a really bad time in my life, and I honestly couldn’t tell if it was “freeing” or not for those involved in the book.  However, I do think I could still recommend giving this a go.  Not a bad read at all.

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The Heiress of Linn Hagh by Karen Charlton.

Series: The Detective Lavender Mysteries (Book 1)
Paperback: 325 pages
Publisher: Thomas & Mercer (June 9, 2015)
ISBN-10: 1477830081

 

Northumberland, 1809: A beautiful young heiress disappears from her locked bedchamber at Linn Hagh.

The local constables are baffled and the townsfolk cry ‘witchcraft’.

The heiress’s uncle summons help from Detective Lavender and his assistant, Constable Woods, who face one of their most challenging cases: The servants and local gypsies aren’t talking; Helen’s siblings are uncooperative; and the sullen local farmers are about to take the law into their own hands.

Lavender and Woods find themselves trapped in the middle of a simmering feud as they uncover a world of family secrets, intrigue and deception in their search for the missing heiress.

Taut, wry and delightful, The Heiress of Linn Hagh is a rollicking tale featuring Lavender and Woods—a double act worthy of Holmes and Watson.

 

This was an enjoyable read.  Good characters and lots of things happening before you finally get to the results ! As some know I also like that the mysteries / murders etc. happen in the 1800’s in England. (smirk).

I’ve never read anything by Karen Charlton before but, I think I will try a second by her using Detective Lavender and Constable Woods.

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Bring Her Home

Bring Her Home by David Bell.

Paperback: 464 pages
Publisher: Berkley (July 11, 2017)
ISBN-10: 0399584447

Amazon Review

In the breathtaking new thriller from David Bell, bestselling author of Since She Went Away and Somebody I Used to Know, the fate of two missing teenage girls becomes a father’s worst nightmare….

Just a year and a half after the tragic death of his wife, Bill Price’s fifteen-year-old daughter, Summer, and her best friend, Haley, disappear. Days later, the girls are found in a city park. Haley is dead at the scene, while Summer is left beaten beyond recognition and clinging to life.
As Bill holds vigil over Summer’s bandaged body, the only sound the unconscious girl can make is one cryptic and chilling word: No. And the more time Bill spends with Summer, the more he wonders what happened to her. Or if the injured girl in the hospital bed is really his daughter at all.
When troubling new questions about Summer’s life surface, Bill is not prepared for the aftershocks. He’ll soon discover that both the living and the dead have secrets. And that searching for the truth will tear open old wounds that pierce straight to the heart of his family…

 

Ok so.. this is what happens when I read one of those rare authors that really grab me from the start!  I posted my last book only 3 days ago.. but then, every book I’ve read by David Bell I can’t seem to put down!

Bring Her Back is an excellent mystery, and Bell knows how to keep you on edge.  Though I guessed at “who done it” the anxiety held by other characters kept you consistently, on edge.

In case you can’t tell.. I love David Bell’s writing.  I have read nearly every book he has written!  Only one that I haven’t and it’s listed below.

I am sure the first book I read of Bell’s was “The Cemetery Girl“, and from then on it’s history.  I’ve read all the books below except the last one.. and some day… some way.. I will get to that one too!

 

The Cemerery Girl               Somebody I Used to Know    The Forgotten Girl

     

Since She Went Away            The Girl in the Woods         Never Come Back

     

The Hiding Place

 

..and the only one I haven’t read..and due to price may not get to read is: The Condemned.

 

 

I can’t recommend this author any stronger.  Read just ONE of his books and you will want to read more. (They are not a series that you have to read in order).

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The Last Bookaneer

The Last Bookaneer by Matthew Pearl.

Hardcover: 389 pages
Publisher: Penguin Press (1900)
ASIN: B01G3CMAGA

 

London, 1890—Pen Davenport is the most infamous bookaneer in Europe. A master of disguise, he makes his living stalking harbors, coffeehouses, and print shops for the latest manuscript to steal. But this golden age of publishing is on the verge of collapse. For a hundred years, loose copyright laws and a hungry reading public created a unique opportunity: books could easily be published abroad without an author’s permission. Authors gained fame but suffered financially—Charles Dickens, Mark Twain, Robert Louis Stevenson, to name a few—but publishers reaped enormous profits while readers bought books inexpensively. Yet on the eve of the twentieth century, a new international treaty is signed to grind this literary underground to a sharp halt. The bookaneers are on the verge of extinction.
From the New York Times–bestselling author of The Dante Club, Matthew Pearl, The Last Bookaneer is the astonishing story of these literary thieves’ epic final heist. On the island of Samoa, a dying Robert Louis Stevenson labors over a new novel. The thought of one last book from the great author fires the imaginations of the bookaneers, and soon Davenport sets out for the South Pacific accompanied by his assistant Fergins. But Davenport is hardly the only bookaneer with a mind to pirate Stevenson’s last novel. His longtime adversary, the monstrous Belial, appears on the island, and soon Davenport, Fergins, and Belial find themselves embroiled in a conflict larger, perhaps, than literature itself.
In The Last Bookaneer, Pearl crafts a finely wrought tale about a showdown between brilliant men in the last great act of their professions. It is nothing short of a page-turning journey to the heart of a lost era
.

 

Bookaneer. A review of The Last Bookaneer by Matthew Pearl produced a word new to me, one with an intriguing history. His title term refers to literary thieves of the nineteenth century who exploited the lack of international copyright agreements to publish counterfeit editions in foreign countries.

I often enjoy reading a historical novel.  I like knowing of the people being used in the novel.

I enjoyed reading this book. I have read others by Matthew Pearl and enjoyed those also.  It is not a book that I loved so much I will read it again… or a book I could not put down, but still it was interesting enough that I didn’t toss it aside never to pick it up again.

I suggest you read the Amazon review and make your own mind up.

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