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Murder in Park Lane

Murder in Park Lane by Karen Charlton.

 

Paperback: 316 pages
Publisher: Thomas & Mercer (March 26, 2019)
ISBN-10: 1503955621

 

Amazon Review:

 

London, 1812. At a fashionable address in leafy Mayfair, a far cry from Detective Stephen Lavender’s usual haunts, a man is found dead in his room. He has been brutally stabbed, but the door is locked from the inside and the weapon is missing.

The deceased is David MacAdam, an Essex businessman with expensive tastes. As Lavender and Constable Ned Woods travel between London and Chelmsford seeking to understand MacAdam’s final hours and unearth the grisly truth, they uncover a tangled web of deceit behind his stylish facade. The unusual circumstances of MacAdam’s death are nothing compared to the shady nature of his life and it seems the house on Park Lane is at the heart of a dark conspiracy.

But when a second body turns up, everything they think they’ve learned is thrown into doubt. Can Lavender and Woods find out who’s behind these shocking murders before more lives are ruined?

 

This was an enjoyable read.  Short chapters , which I like, and good characters.  In fact, almost to many characters!  But I did seem to keep them straight, so that would mean anyone can!

I’ve read a few others of Karen Charlton, so she’s not a new author to me.  The book is a “2 fer”.. two for one murder investigation. I figured it out about the time the book did ! lol.

So it’s onward and upward to the next mystery…………..

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There There

There There , a novel by Tommy Orange.

 

Print Length: 292 pages
Publisher: Vintage; Reprint edition (June 5, 2018)
ASIN: B075HY1NFB

 

 

 

An Amazon Best Book of June 2018: What does it really mean to be an Indian/Native American/American Indian/Native? Orange’s vivid debut novel allows a unique cast—ranging from teenagers to elders—to pull this question apart even as they add a modern layer of complexity: They live in the urban landscape of Oakland, California. The thrust of Orange’s cross-cut storytelling is not to force his characters onto a strict plot line but to explore the varied ways of being an Indian and, more important, of feeling like an Indian. Fractured families, Oakland itself, and detachment from tradition make an Indian identity seem even more elusive to the younger characters, but it’s a feeling that they unknowingly share—and that Orange wants to expose. As an amateur filmmaker says to a teen he’s interviewing, “When you hear stories from people like you, you feel less alone.” Isolation and longing permeate the page, lifted briefly only as the characters intersect at the Big Oakland Powwow, with chaotic results. If I have any quibble about the book (and it could be a failure of mine, really), it’s that there are a few too many characters for me to comfortably hold in my head. But then again, this isn’t a comfortable novel, and therein lies its power and purpose. —Adrian Liang, Amazon Book Review

 

Tommy Orange’s “groundbreaking, extraordinary” (The New York Times) There There is the “brilliant, propulsive” (People Magazine) story of twelve unforgettable characters, Urban Indians living in Oakland, California, who converge and collide on one fateful day. It’s “the year’s most galvanizing debut novel” (Entertainment Weekly).

As we learn the reasons that each person is attending the Big Oakland Powwow—some generous, some fearful, some joyful, some violent—momentum builds toward a shocking yet inevitable conclusion that changes everything. Jacquie Red Feather is newly sober and trying to make it back to the family she left behind in shame. Dene Oxendene is pulling his life back together after his uncle’s death and has come to work at the powwow to honor his uncle’s memory. Opal Viola Victoria Bear Shield has come to watch her nephew Orvil, who has taught himself traditional Indian dance through YouTube videos and will to perform in public for the very first time. There will be glorious communion, and a spectacle of sacred tradition and pageantry. And there will be sacrifice, and heroism, and loss.

There There is a wondrous and shattering portrait of an America few of us have ever seen. It’s “masterful . . . white-hot . . . devastating” (The Washington Post) at the same time as it is fierce, funny, suspenseful, thoroughly modern, and impossible to put down. Here is a voice we have never heard—a voice full of poetry and rage, exploding onto the page with urgency and force. Tommy Orange has written a stunning novel that grapples with a complex and painful history, with an inheritance of beauty and profound spirituality, and with a plague of addiction, abuse, and suicide. This is the book that everyone is talking about right now, and it’s destined to be a classic.

 

This book won’t be for everyone.  But, it will be for people like me who have such strong feelings for Native Americans.   I read a book called, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee .  It was about much of the history of Western Native American’s. How they were treated. How they were massacred. And how they tried to survive. I will forever keep that book.

Now, There There comes along.  If you can get thru the preface without crying , the book is probably not for you.  It is a book however of “stories” of some young Native American’s of “today” .. how they survive.. or not.   It is the second book of Native American’s that I will keep forever.

The Wolf in Winter

The Wolf in Winter by John Connolly.

 

Hardcover: 432 pages
Publisher: Atria/Emily Bestler Books(October 28, 2014)
ISBN-10: 1476703183

 

 

Amazon Review

 

The community of Prosperous, Maine has always thrived when others have suffered. Its inhabitants are wealthy, its children’s future secure. It shuns outsiders. It guards its own. And at the heart of Prosperous lie the ruins of an ancient church, transported stone by stone from England centuries earlier by the founders of the town…

But the death of a homeless man and the disappearance of his daughter draw the haunted, lethal private investigator Charlie Parker to Prosperous. Parker is a dangerous man, driven by compassion, by rage, and by the desire for vengeance. In him the town and its protectors sense a threat graver than any they have faced in their long history, and in the comfortable, sheltered inhabitants of a small Maine town, Parker will encounter his most vicious opponents yet.

Charlie Parker has been marked to die so that Prosperous may survive.

Prosperous, and the secret that it hides beneath its ruins…

 

I’m not sure what to say about this book.  I did read the entire book. Nice short chapters. The Wolf in the title seemed to have little to do with the story. (at least to me)  The whole town seemed to be  a “religious cult” that also felt they needed to “feed'” their “god” with a human female now and then.

It wasn’t my kind of book though I read it all wondering if I was missing something to make me more “into” the story.

There was one paragraph I found myself reading more than once.. it  dealt with a street person:

“Each day is the same, and each day you get a little older and a little more tired.  And sometimes you’d remember who you were.  You were a kid who played with other kids. You had a mother and a father.  You had a husband. You had a wife. You were loved.  You could never have imagined that you would end up this way.”

It could actually mean many people, not just street people.

 

If you like John Connolly I think you will like this book.

Layover

Layover by David Bell.

 

Paperback: 416 pages
Publisher: Berkley (July 2, 2019)
ISBN-10: 0440000874

 

 

Amazon Review:

 

Joshua Fields takes the same flights every week for work, his life a series of departures and arrivals, hotels and airports. During yet another layover, he meets Morgan, a beautiful stranger with whom he feels an immediate connection. When it’s time for their respective flights, Morgan kisses Joshua passionately, lamenting that they’ll never see each other again.

As soon as Morgan disappears in the crowd, Joshua is shocked to see her face on a nearby TV. The reason: Morgan is a missing person.

What follows is a whirlwind, fast-paced journey filled with lies, deceit, and secrets as Joshua tries to discover why Morgan has vanished from her own life. Every time he thinks one mystery is solved, another rears its head—and his worst enemy might be his own assumptions about those around him.

 

David Bell is one of the authors that I’ve read all his books:  SOMEBODY’S DAUGHTER, BRING HER HOME, SINCE SHE WENT AWAY, SOMEBODY I USED TO KNOW, THE FORGOTTEN GIRL, NEVER COME BACK, THE HIDING PLACE, and CEMETERY GIRL.  And for me it all began with Cemetery Girl. Thanks to Carl Anderson!)

This was a good mystery but for whatever reasons I liked  all his other books better.  I did like this book.. but like the others better.. He’s still a super writer!

Plague Pits & River Bones

Plague Pits & River Bones by Karen Charlton.

 

Paperback: 348 pages
Publisher: Thomas & Mercer (January 11, 2018)
ISBN-10: 1542048397

 

Amazon Review:

 

London, 1812: Treacherous gangs roam the capital, and not even the Palace of Westminster is safe. When Detective Stephen Lavender is called in to investigate a highway robbery and a cold-blooded murder, both the cases take a dangerous and disturbing personal twist.

And when Lavender’s trusted deputy, Constable Ned Woods, finds a mysterious severed foot washed up on Greenwich Beach, they soon realise that these ancient bones are more sinister than they first appeared.

With Bow Street Police Office undermanned and in disarray, it will take all of Lavender and Woods’s wit and skill—and some help from Lavender’s spirited wife, Magdalena—to unmask the fiend behind the mayhem, restore peace and justice to the beleaguered city and solve the tragic mystery of the severed foot.

But will they do so in time to foil a plot that threatens to plunge the country into chaos?

 

This is not my first Detective Lavender book, but it is the first in a very long time.  I am surprised I went so long without reading another book by Karen Charlton.  She is very good at describing any area of “old London” .

It was a quick read and she had more than one thing going on without confusion.  I enjoyed this one and will keep and eye out for another Detective Lavender story.

The Woman in The Woods

The Woman in the Woods by John Connolly.

 

Hardcover: 496 pages
Publisher: Atria/Emily Bestler Books (June 12, 2018)
ISBN-10: 1501171925

 

 

Amazon Review:

 

In the beautiful Maine woods, a partly preserved body is discovered. Investigators realize that the dead young woman gave birth shortly before her death. But there is no sign of a baby.

Private detective Charlie Parker is hired by a lawyer to shadow the police investigation and find the infant but Parker is not the only searcher. Someone else is following the trail left by the woman, someone with an interest in much more than a missing child…someone prepared to leave bodies in his wake.

And in a house by the woods, a toy telephone begins to ring and a young boy is about to receive a call from a dead woman.

 

I have to say.. when I saw this title (and I have read some John Connolly) it sounded good.. a body in the woods.. right up my alley… wrong!

The character looking for parts of an “atlas” and his partner who kills everyone involved did not hold my interest.  I did read the whole book but kept hoping there would be more “Charlie Parker” and less of all the other characters involved.   This is a first John Connolly book that make a “good read” for me.

Concrete Blonde

Concrete Blonde by Michael Connelly.

Hardcover: 392 pages
Publisher: Little Brown;(June 1, 1994)
ISBN-10: 9780316153836

 

Amazon Review:

 

Detective Harry Bosch was sure he’d shot the serial killer responsible for a string of murders in LA . . . but now, a new crime makes him question his convictions.

The Dollmaker was the name of the serial killer who had stalked Los Angeles ruthlessly, leaving grisly calling cards on the faces of his female victims. Now with a single faultless shot, Detective Harry Bosch thinks he has ended the city’s nightmare.

But the dead man’s widow is suing Harry and the LAPD for killing the wrong man– an accusation that rings terrifyingly true when a new victim is discovered with the Dollmaker’s macabre signature.

So for the second time, Harry must hunt down a death-dealer who is very much alive, before he strikes again. It’s a blood-tracked quest that will take Harry from the hard edges of the L.A. night to the last place he ever wanted to go– the darkness of his own heart.

With The Concrete Blonde, Edgar Award-winning author Michael Connelly has hit a whole new level in his career, creating a breathtaking thriller that thrusts you into a blistering courtroom battle– and a desperate search for a sadistic killer.

 

Wow.. this was a much earlier Detective Bosch book.  At first It read like only a trial.. about the time I thought that maybe I wasn’t as happy with this as the rest of the Bosch books.. it took off!  Holy cow! Twist and turn and surprise after surprise!  I guess you’d say.. I liked it! lol.

………………………………………………………………………..

 

Native American Wisdom edited by Kent Nerburn and Louise Mengelkoch.

 

Hardcover: 128 pages
Publisher: New World Library; 1St Edition edition (January 1, 1993)
ISBN-10: 0931432782

 

 

We recognize the philosophy of the original Americans as coming from the earth we walk on, from those who preceded us. As we read the wisdom of these peoples, it is possible to feel a reconnection with our land and ourselves. This beautiful collection of the best of Native American wisdom features the thoughts of Chief Joseph, Sitting Bull, Red Cloud, Black Elk, Ohiyesa, and many others on Native American ways of living, learning, and dying. Taken from orations, recorded observations of life and social affairs, and other first-person testimonies, this book selects a wide range of Native American wisdom and distills it to its essence in short, digestible quotes that are meaningful and timeless — perhaps even more timely now than when they were written.

Some of the quotes seem not very old but of course those of Sitting Bull, Red Cloud, Black Elk and Ohiyea are “a bit older”!  Nice little book . I would like to hear more quotes from the Native Americans gone by.