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The Buried Giant

The Buried Giant by Kazuo Ishiguro.

Paperback: 336 pages
Publisher: Vintage (January 5, 2016)
ISBN-10: 0307455793

 

 

In post-Arthurian Britain, the wars that once raged between the Saxons and the Britons have finally ceased. Axl and Beatrice, an elderly British couple, set off to visit their son, whom they haven’t seen in years. And, because a strange mist has caused mass amnesia throughout the land, they can scarcely remember anything about him.
As they are joined on their journey by a Saxon warrior, his orphan charge, and an illustrious knight, Axl and Beatrice slowly begin to remember the dark and troubled past they all share. By turns savage, suspenseful, and intensely moving, The Buried Giant is a luminous meditation on the act of forgetting and the power of memory, an extraordinary tale of love, vengeance, and war.

Strangely enough, I really had no idea what this book was actually about when I found it in a box of books for .50.

For me, it was hard to believe that this is the same author who wrote Remains of the Day (movie by the same name).

Familiar names are drawn into this "story telling" book, such as Merlin and Arthur. I found the book to be quit different in the writing I am used to. But it did intrigue me enough to keep reading until the end.  I think that because I have been reading mysteries and murders and such that this was so far out in left base that I was lost part of the time. lol. 

It was an ok book.  Not really my type of writing, but yet interesting enough to let me read it all.  I am sure others would enjoy it more.

The Burning Room.

The Burning Room by Michael Connelly.

Hardcover: 576 pages
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company;(November 3, 2014)
ISBN-10: 0316410705

 

In the LAPD’s Open-Unsolved Unit, not many murder victims die almost a decade after the crime. So when a man succumbs to complications from being shot by a stray bullet nine years earlier, Bosch catches a case in which the body is still fresh, but all other evidence is virtually nonexistent.
Now Bosch and rookie Detective Lucia Soto, are tasked with solving what turns out to be a highly charged, politically sensitive case. Beginning with the bullet that’s been lodged for years in the victim’s spine, they must pull new leads from years-old information, which soon reveal that this shooting may have been anything but random.

This is the second book I’ve read by Michael Connelly.   It was a good read.  Strangely, though it was something missing.  I’m not sure what. Maybe more closeness to the main character of Bosch.

It was a cold case reopened and how they solved the case.  I like watching cold cases being solved on tv and I generally expect "more" in a book.  More detail.  More character building.  I liked the first book I read, the Black Box, but all I can say on this one is:  It’s ok. Not a bad read. But could have been better.

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Lately I just can’t seem to find the books I enjoy so much.  Books like, Diane Setterfield’s,  The Thirteenth Tale, or books by Michael Cox (The Meaning of Night & The Glass of Time), or the Alex Grecian books, The Scotland Yard Murder Squad, The Devil’s Workshop/ The Black Country/The Yard/ The Harvest Man .  Also Dan Simmons, Drood!..  My reading has gone down to a crawl because I don’t seem to be able to find books like these !!   Sigh.. ah well… who knows?  Maybe the next book eh?

The Broken Harbor

The Broken Harbor by Tana French.

Paperback: 450 pages
Publisher: Penguin Books(April 30, 2013)
ISBN-10: 0143123300

 

Amazon Best Books of the Month, July 2012: In Tana French’s fourth novel, detective Mick "Scorcher" Kennedy and his partner are sent to the abandoned, half-constructed housing development Broken Harbor to investigate the brutal murder of the Spain family. What Scorcher thinks is an open and shut case is quickly complicated when Jenny Spain is found barely alive, and the family’s circumstances are brought to light: hidden baby monitors, a strained mortgage brought on by the housing crisis, and the increasingly erratic signs of a family in crisis. French fans will appreciate this new look at Scorcher, who was a minor character in Faithful Place; he shines as the successful but jaded detective with a troubled past. French delivers a layered psychological thriller and satisfying ‘who dunnit,’ masterfully spinning a plot packed with tension and a haunting mood that rivals the best of the gothic writers.

This is book 4 I’ve read of Tana French’s.

It’s also my least favorite.  But… having said that the past month my head has not been with reading very much. I was sick for a time then in pain for a time and stressing about things.. so this was a slow, slow read for me. Also noted though is that I did not set it aside and stop reading it, so that says something too.

The detective Scorcher did not grab me as a interesting character, like most of her leads.  The mystery of the killings was good though.

I don’t have a lot to say to encourage or discourage you to reading this book…  I will more than likely try her next books when it comes out, as I have enjoyed her other books.

Since She Went Away

Since She Went Away by David Bell.

Paperback: 432 pages
Publisher: NAL (June 21, 2016)
ISBN-10: 045147421X

Three months earlier, Jenna Barton was supposed to meet her lifelong best friend Celia. But when Jenna arrived late, she found that Celia had disappeared—and hasn’t been seen again. Jenna has blamed herself for her friend’s disappearance every single day since then.
The only piece of evidence is a lone diamond earring found where Celia and Jenna were planning to meet, leading the national media to dub Celia “The Diamond Mom.” And even though Jenna has obsessively surfed message boards devoted to missing persons cases, she is no closer to finding any answers—or easing her guilt.
But when her son’s new girlfriend—who suddenly arrived in town without a past—disappears, a stricken Jenna begins to unwind the tangled truth behind Celia’s tragedy. And as long-buried secrets finally come to light, she discovers how completely lives can be shattered by a few simple lies.

This is book number 7 for me, written by David Bell. My first was Cemetery Girl and from then on I’ve been a fan.

This book was no exception. I am not sure how to define his writing, but one always feels they are right there and part of the story … and that it’s real! 

Like other’s of his books it’s hard to set them down for very long.  It helps, tremendously, that he writes very short chapters, which always makes you read one or two more before setting the book down!  I don’t know if publishers like that or not but "I" sure do!

Chalk up another  good read from David Bell!

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I don’t always do a list of books I read for each month, but last month all the books were really good so here they are:

21.The Black Box…………………..Michael Connelly….(480 pgs)

22.Cracks in the Sidewalk…………..Bette L. Crosby…..(332 pgs)

23.A Memory of Violets……………..Hazel Gaynor……..(432 pgs)

24.The Midnight Rose……………….Lucinda Riley…….(496 pgs)

25.The Likeness……………………Tana French………(466 pgs)

I didn’t read when I was on my trip except for something on my tablet that I "thought" was a full length book but turned out to be only 48 pages. It was Confessions of an English Opium Eater by Thomas DeQuincey.  Maybe I should count that as a book anyway lol…

Well, Happy Reading for you all for the month of July!!

Faithful Place

Faithful Place by Tana French.

Paperback: 400 pages
Publisher: Penguin Books;(June 28, 2011)
ISBN-10: 0143119494

 

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. French’s emotionally searing third novel of the Dublin murder squad (after The Likeness) shows the Irish author getting better with each book. In 1985, 19-yearold Frank Mackey and his girlfriend, Rosie Daly, made secret plans to elope to England and start a new life together far away from their families, particularly the hard-drinking Mackeys. But when Rosie doesn’t meet Frank the night they’re meant to leave and he finds a note, Frank assumes she’s left him behind. For 22 years, Frank, who becomes an undercover cop, stays away from Faithful Place, his childhood Dublin neighborhood. When his younger sister, Jackie, calls to tell him that someone found Rosie’s suitcase hidden in an abandoned house, Frank reluctantly returns. Now everything he thought he knew is turned upside down: did Rosie really leave that night, or did someone stop her before she could? French, who briefly introduced Mackey in The Likeness, is adept at seamlessly blending suspenseful whodunit elements with Frank’s familial demons.

Book number 4 that I’ve read by Tana French.  She really knows how to tell a story and keep you interested on reading to the very end.  This one is a 22 year old cold case. And I do get hooked on cold cases lol.

This one I wasn’t sure I would like.  On her other book she used the character of Frank Mackey and I can’t say he was a favorite lol.. so when this book was "about" Frank Mackey", I was leery.  But she turned him into someone of interest and made me read this book to the end also! 

Her books are quick reading and keep your interest.  I have one more in my tbr mile high pile which I will get to after one book that I waited for it to come and now I have to read that first! (That would be David Bell.  I have read every book he’s written! another one of those, have to read, authors).

The Likeness

The Likeness by Tana French.

Paperback: 466 pages
Publisher: Penguin Books;(May 26, 2009)
ISBN-10: 0143115626

Tana French astonished critics and readers alike with her mesmerizing debut novel, In the Woods. Now both French and Detective Cassie Maddox return to unravel a case even more sinister and enigmatic than the first. Six months after the events of In the Woods, an urgent telephone call beckons Cassie to a grisly crime scene. The victim looks exactly like Cassie and carries ID identifying herself as Alexandra Madison, an alias Cassie once used. Suddenly, Cassie must discover not only who killed this girl, but, more importantly, who is this girl? A disturbing tale of shifting identities,

Quite a long time ago I read Tana French’s first book "In the Woods" and remember enjoying it.  Not sure what took me so long to read another of her books, but I finally did and it was enjoyable too. 

It was different.

Undercover detective work generally means to pass yourself off as someone you are not.  In this case Cassie Maddox had to go among friends and pass herself off as a friend they thought was dead.  How does one convince 4 good friends that she’s their "not dead" friend?    I think she wrote the story quite well., and like I said.. it was different, so I wasn’t sure what to expect.   She had four different personalities to deal with and the detective that put her on the case once they realized she could be the dead girls twin sister. 

I have two more of her books sitting around here so, I may pick another up before I try another author.  Until next time………………………… enjoy whatever you are reading!

The Midnight Rose

The Midnight Rose by Lucinda Riley.

Paperback: 496 pages
Publisher: Atria Books (March 18, 2014)
ISBN-10: 1476703574

 

 

From Booklist

For Anahita Chavan, childhood in India under the British raj was simple and happy. But when she is asked to become the companion to the maharajah’s daughter, Princess Indira, Anni is suddenly exposed to a life of wealth and privilege. Then the two girls are sent to England to attend boarding school, a move that will change Anni’s life in ways she never dreamed of. Meanwhile, in present-day England, American actress Rebecca Bradley has snagged the first serious role of her career, playing a 1920s debutante living on a beautiful Dartmoor estate. As filming begins, the manor receives an unexpected visitor, Ari Malik, Anahita’s great-grandson, who is on a quest to learn about Anni’s past. Riley, the best-selling author of The Orchid House (2011), has once again written an extraordinary story, a complex, deeply engaging tale filled with fascinating characters whose slowly revealed secrets carry readers to the very end. Spanning four generations and moving from the great palaces of India to the stately country home of an English lord, this is a sweeping tale of love lost and found.

I think the reason I got this book is because I have read most of Lucinda Riley’s books and have always liked them.  Of course then there is the mention of Dartmoor..heh.  So , I had a good chance of enjoying the book.   Never gave a thought to learning about how India woman of high esteem had to live. (now I know what it was like back in the day).

It was a very good read.  Back and forth a few generations but never had trouble following it.  I gave a thought that the ending was rushed a bit ..strange to say that when the book was just shy of 500 pages! (a few more wouldn’t have hurt).

Anyone who has read any of  Lucinda Riley books and enjoyed them will certainly enjoy this one if they haven’t already read it.  I like her writing style.  Things flow so well that I went thru this book way faster than I ever thought I would!!

If you don’t try this book you might want to try one of her others.. they are all enjoyable! "The Orchard House", "The Girl on the Cliff" and "The Lavender Garden"…

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